Come from Lebanon, my promised bride, come from Lebanon, come on your way. Look down from the heights of Amanus, from the crests of Senir and Hermon, the haunt of lions, the mountains of leopards.
(Song of Songs 4:8)
Reblogged from acatholicvibe  3 notes
acatholicvibe:

Great Friday of the Crucifixion

 O Christ our God, in your great and unspeakable love for all, you became our sacrifice on Golgotha. By offering yourself, you pardoned the sin of the world. You enabled weak and sinful people to receive your body and life-giving blood. You have made us worthy of offering your acceptable sacrifices in memory of your saving passion and glorious resurrection. You have given us this sign for the purification of our souls and bodies. With the prophet David, we cry out and say: “I shall receive the cup of salvation and call upon the name of the Lord.”

acatholicvibe:

Great Friday of the Crucifixion

 O Christ our God, in your great and unspeakable love for all, you became our sacrifice on Golgotha. By offering yourself, you pardoned the sin of the world. You enabled weak and sinful people to receive your body and life-giving blood. You have made us worthy of offering your acceptable sacrifices in memory of your saving passion and glorious resurrection. You have given us this sign for the purification of our souls and bodies. With the prophet David, we cry out and say: “I shall receive the cup of salvation and call upon the name of the Lord.”

O God the Word, our Lord Jesus Christ, you are the Lord of heaven and earth and the consuming Flame upon whom the fiery ranks of heaven dare not look. In your compassion, you clothed yourself with a body. The heavenly creatures who serve you with reverence hide their faces before you.

Almighty God, Source of Life, in your mercy, you chose to bow your head before the creation of your hands. You washed your disciples’ feet and imparted an authentic example of your humility for us to follow. You have shown us how to imitate your saving meekness.

Now, allow us, your servants gathered here before you, to cleanse ourselves from every trace of sin as we follow the example of your humility. May our minds be illuminated by the way you humble yourself. Through your humility, may we loose the bonds of vanity and the destructive tendencies of the adversary. May we put on humility, gladness, and true love, for you instructed us to serve each other with the purity and holiness worthy of true disciples and servants. May we preserve the memory of your saving passion and your life-giving death, O Christ, so we may observe the feast of your glorious resurrection, now and for ever.

By From the Maronite Rite of Washing of Feet on Holy Thursday

Holy Thursday And Rite of Washing of Feet
The Book of Rituals (Rome, 1839) retains two traditions of the Maronite Church. The oldest one required the washing of the feet of the whole congregation present at the service. The more recent tradition limited the washing to twelve persons representing the Twelve Apostles.
The rite of washing of feet was originally accompanied by a group of hymns with their prayers and a soogitho ( a Hymn ordered according to the letters of the alphabet). The first prayer the soogitho are used in the present service as the beginning of the rite. During the soogitho the twelve person chosen to have their feet washed come forward and take their places at the chairs prepared for them.
The altar is covered in white. A side altar or table is prepared to receive the consecrated eucharist for the Anaphora of Signing of the Chalice. This altar (or table) is covered in white and is decorated with flowers and candles. These decorations should be kept simple.
A cross with the body of Christ on it is prepared in front of the main altar. Lighted candles are placed on each side of the cross.
A pitcher of water, a basin, and towels are placed on a table in the sanctuary.
Twelve chairs are placed in the sanctuary for those whose feet will be washed. Six chairs are arranged on each side of the sanctuary, facing each other. A thirteenth chair is provided for the celebrant. It is placed in the center at the end of the two rows of chairs closest to the congregation and faces the altar and cross.
A priest (or deacon) who is able to sing well is assigned to sing the gospel. The singing of the gospel coincides with the celebrant’s action of washing the feet.
Twelve members of the community (priests, ministers, and lay people) are assigned to represent the apostles. They may be vested in alas or may wear their ordinary clothes.
The washing of feet is done in four stages, three people each time. The washing begins with the three people on the right side of the celebrant, then the three on the left, then the last three on the right, and finally the last three on the left. The last person on the left side represents Simon Peter.
The deacon sings the appropriate text of the gospel (John 13:3-5) as the feet of each group of three are washed, then the choir sings one more verse of the Hymn when the celebrant is seated.
The dialogue between Jesus and Simon Peter (John 13:6-11) concludes the singing of the gospel of John (13:12-20), followed by the closing prayer of the rite.

Holy Thursday And Rite of Washing of Feet

The Book of Rituals (Rome, 1839) retains two traditions of the Maronite Church. The oldest one required the washing of the feet of the whole congregation present at the service. The more recent tradition limited the washing to twelve persons representing the Twelve Apostles.

The rite of washing of feet was originally accompanied by a group of hymns with their prayers and a soogitho ( a Hymn ordered according to the letters of the alphabet). The first prayer the soogitho are used in the present service as the beginning of the rite. During the soogitho the twelve person chosen to have their feet washed come forward and take their places at the chairs prepared for them.

The altar is covered in white. A side altar or table is prepared to receive the consecrated eucharist for the Anaphora of Signing of the Chalice. This altar (or table) is covered in white and is decorated with flowers and candles. These decorations should be kept simple.

A cross with the body of Christ on it is prepared in front of the main altar. Lighted candles are placed on each side of the cross.

A pitcher of water, a basin, and towels are placed on a table in the sanctuary.

Twelve chairs are placed in the sanctuary for those whose feet will be washed. Six chairs are arranged on each side of the sanctuary, facing each other. A thirteenth chair is provided for the celebrant. It is placed in the center at the end of the two rows of chairs closest to the congregation and faces the altar and cross.

A priest (or deacon) who is able to sing well is assigned to sing the gospel. The singing of the gospel coincides with the celebrant’s action of washing the feet.

Twelve members of the community (priests, ministers, and lay people) are assigned to represent the apostles. They may be vested in alas or may wear their ordinary clothes.

The washing of feet is done in four stages, three people each time. The washing begins with the three people on the right side of the celebrant, then the three on the left, then the last three on the right, and finally the last three on the left. The last person on the left side represents Simon Peter.

The deacon sings the appropriate text of the gospel (John 13:3-5) as the feet of each group of three are washed, then the choir sings one more verse of the Hymn when the celebrant is seated.

The dialogue between Jesus and Simon Peter (John 13:6-11) concludes the singing of the gospel of John (13:12-20), followed by the closing prayer of the rite.